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I did not write this book, I am mearly sharing it for educational purposes only. The Bluest Eye PDF is a classic novel written by Toni Morrison. The Bluest Eye PDF, Epub Plot And Review: The Bluest Eye PDF revolves around the lives of two sisters, named Claudia and Frieda. The Bluest Eye (Vintage International series) by Toni Morrison. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format.


The Bluest Eye Epub

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The Bluest Eye Epub is a tale of two sisters – Claudia and Frieda. Biological sisters of Afro-American descent, they are separated in childhood as they are sent to. Nobel prize-winning author of Beloved, Toni Morrison's debut novel immerses us in the tragic, torn lives of a poor black family – Pauline, Cholly, Sam and Pecola. Download Now: pixia-club.info?book= [PDF] Download The Bluest Eye (Vintage International) Ebook #ebook #full #read.

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Used here as the first words uttered by Claudia, the phrase functions as an invitation to the reader to participate in the ancient tradition of listening to storytellers pondering the mysteries of life. In this way, Claudia takes on a role Morrison emphasized in her own writing—that of the griot who, in African folklore, is responsible for repeating and enlivening the traditional teachings in order to ensure that the essential wisdom and secrets will be transmitted through the generations.

This development in Claudia is one of the major issues the novel considers. When she assumes that role, she identifies herself as an active tradition bearer, who, in her younger as well as her more mature manifestations, has the responsibility of putting a horrible tale into perspective.

The tale is one in which the culture has been threatened from without as well as from within; it therefore takes on the form of myth. How can a people survive such assaults on them? And if they do, who will give voice to their heroic or failed efforts?

Literacy here is a life-saving acquisition. Intimations of poverty are everywhere: the need to collect coal fragments fallen off trains onto the track, old windows that let in the cold, the need to take in a boarder, and the fact that only one room is kept lighted and warm at night.

But there is also a sense of security in the home: sister bonding, maternal vigilance against childhood illnesses, a bed that finally gets warm after just the right adjustments are made, the sounds of singing, and a father, who, although taciturn and removed, provides for his family and acts instantly to protect his daughters, as he does when he learns Frieda has been molested.

Awareness of hierarchy and exclusion are central issues in the novel, experienced minimally in the domestic life but as a pervasive and insidious influence outside the home. Rosemary taunts the sisters by sitting in the family Buick eating bread with butter on it. The scene is reminiscent of the dramas all children must endure in the early years of identity formation.

It also functions as a portal into the divisions between people and classes and points to the destructive influence of internalizing the idealized images of the dominant culture. Rather than passive acceptance of their historically designated object position, the girls physically assert their beings on Rosemary by attacking her and marring the skin that in white culture puts Rosemary above them and denies their subject status.

The girls internalize their place in the social world through these responses to daily encounters. She seems to react intuitively to their beating by feeling she should further sexualize it. Morrison is cautious about judging too quickly the transgressions of others, or, rather, she insists on seeing things from multiple perspectives.

Like all children, the sisters are often mystified by the goingson of adult life. Claudia and Frieda love to overhear their mother chattering and gossiping with her friends; they listen for 32 secrets about members of the community and for explanations of perplexing events.

When Mr. Henry shows up at their door and becomes a boarder in the household, they are unable to detect the signs of his secret appetites and general neediness because they are so pleased when he addresses them as the glamorous Hollywood stars, Greta Garbo and Ginger Rogers.

[Download] The Bluest Eye [PDF][Epub][Mobi] – By Toni Morrison

If you are put out, you go somewhere else; if you are outdoors, there is no place to go. The distinction was subtle but final. Outdoors was the end of something, an irrevocable, physical fact, defining and complementing our metaphysical condition.

Being a minority in both caste and class, we moved about anyway on the hem of life, struggling to consolidate our weaknesses and hang on, or creep singly up into the major folds of the garment.

The voice of an older Claudia remembers: Knowing that there was such a thing as outdoors bred in us a hunger for property, for ownership. The firm possession of a yard, a porch, a grape arbor. Propertied 33 black people spent all their energies, all their love, on their nests. Like frenzied, desperate birds, they over decorated everything; fussed and fidgeted over their hardwon homes; canned, jellied, and preserved all summer to fill the cupboards and shelves; they painted, picked, and poked at every corner of their houses.

The discovery of the missing milk sends Mrs. She knows something about being a nurturing mother. The appearance of the Shirley Temple cup brings to the fore the vexing questions about establishing definitions of beauty and right behavior—what standards exist for definitions of beauty, how to consider racial differences in appreciating cultural beauty, and, most importantly, what consequences are associated with living under a dominant definition of beauty that minority peoples can never realize?

In appearance and temperament, Shirley Temple was like the Jane character in the primer, a model child. The blue-and-white cup bearing an image of her happy, dimpled face is one example. Frieda and Pecola share an adoration of Shirley Temple that Claudia at first repudiates. Claudia confesses that as a child she did not like dolls, despising the ones she got for Christmas from adults who never actually asked her what she would like to have as a gift.

She will need to find another way to take her stand against a set of ideals that will always undermine rather than nurture her well-being. The discovery comes as a shock. The episode has a benign but not fully reassuring ending: The conversation among the three little girls in bed that night is inspired by the events of the day; Pecola wonders how menstruation makes babies possible. I mean, how do you get someone to love you?

In the next section, we see what was formerly the Breedlove family dwelling—as sharp a contrast to the green-and-white house with the red door belonging to Dick and Jane as one could imagine. Eliot will likely be reminded of scenes from The Waste Land, where the desolation and physical ugliness of modern urban sprawl predominate, and relationships between people are strained at best, sterile at worst, and always transient.

The economic realities of the times combined with the less overt northern racism undermined these expectations in many instances. Trudier Harris writes: The cultural beliefs that inform the storytelling in The Bluest Eye are manifested in a reversal of cultural health for black people, an acquiescence to destructive myths.

Morrison creates an environment and a landscape in which infertility is the norm, where values with the potential to sustain have been reversed or perverted, and where few individuals have the key to transcending their inertia. Her depiction of the cycle of seasons without growth, from autumn to summer, evoke, in their mythological implications, comparisons to the legend of the Fisher King and to the world T.

Eliot creates in The Waste Land. The novel is a ritualized exploration of the dissolution of culture and the need for an attendant rite of affirmation. Harris, 27 The description of the interior of the Breedlove home suggests and reflects the dysfunctionality of the people who had been living there.

The space is so nonnurturing and incommodious that family members are not only unable to relate to one another, they cannot form pleasant associations with the physical features of the house: 37 [The furnishings] were anything but describable, having been conceived, manufactured, shipped, and sold in various states of thoughtlessness, greed, and indifference.

The furniture had aged without ever having become familiar. People had owned it, but never known it. No one had lost a penny or a brooch under the cushions of either sofa and remembered the place and time of the loss or the finding. Cholly Breedlove has an alcoholic stench that sickens his daughter Pecola, and his drinking renders him almost useless around the house.

Breedlove thinks of herself as a religious woman, but she is more selfrighteous than religious. The conflicts impart significant damage to the next generation as well.

Sammy Breedlove expresses himself through bursts of murderous rage aimed at his father, and Pecola, staying hidden in bed to escape the sounds of parental fighting, and suffering 38 from nausea that might be an early sign of her pregnancy, asks God to help her become invisible.

To this end, she has invented a mental strategy to make each part of her body disappear, except her eyes. Claudia has two voices in the story.

To gain access to the innermost thoughts of Pecola, Morrison also creates the voice of an omniscient narrator. This intermixing of voices with different perspectives from varying time frames is necessary for understanding as fully as possible the causes, influences, and consequences of the various actions her vivid characters take.

At the beginning of the section describing Breedlove family life, Morrison makes clear that this family has one thing in common aside from but connected to their shared dysfunction: The Breedloves did not live in a storefront because they were having temporary difficulty adjusting to cutbacks at the plant. They lived there because they were poor and black, and stayed there because they believed they were ugly.

Although their poverty was traditional and stultifying, it was not unique. But their ugliness was unique. No one could have convinced them that they were not relentlessly and aggressively ugly. Throughout the novel, Morrison adds to our understanding about why each member of the family has acquired a destructive and self-sabotaging attitude, but it is Pecola she chooses as her focus.

She has been explicit about her reasons for concentrating on the character of Pecola. Writing in , critic Stephanie A. Pecola stands for the triple indemnity of the female Black child: children, Blacks, and females are devalued in American culture.

It had occurred to Pecola some time ago that if her eyes. If she looked different, beautiful, maybe Cholly would be different, and Mrs. Breedlove, too. Pecola becomes the object of such a disapproving gaze when she visits the candy store with her three pennies. Yacobowski, proprietor of his own grocery store and another member of the white immigrant population, impatiently, almost resentfully, waits on Pecola. She gets what she came for—three pieces of the candy called Mary Janes—but is denied what she more importantly needs, friendly human contact.

Mary Jane, the character for whom the candies are named, appears pictured on the wrappers, her pretty, blue-eyed face smiling mischievously. Critic Tracey L. She achieves this by eating Mary Jane candy. It is with these friendly women—not, strikingly, with her own mother or other appropriate adult female—that Pecola feels sufficiently comfortable to ask questions about men, sex, and love.

Maureen appears to have no flaws—a condition the sisters find unendurable, so they come up with a nickname for her, transforming Maureen Peal into Meringue Pie, and they learn 42 that she has both an unattractive canine tooth and signs of an early disfigurement on her hands. Morrison critics in general praise the author for her adeptness at exposing the causes and consequences of class divisions in American society.

The appearance of Maureen Peal allows Morrison to make even more potent observations. Morrison clearly. The making of such a divisive hierarchy based on economic status and skin color is harmful to everyone.

That they themselves were black, or that their own father had similarly relaxed habits was irrelevant. It was their contempt for their own blackness that gave the first insult its teeth.

They seemed to have taken all of their smoothly cultivated ignorance, their exquisitely learned self-hatred, their elaborately designed hopelessness and sucked it all up into a fiery cone of scorn that had burned for ages in the hollows of their minds—cooled—and spilled over lips of outrage, consuming whatever was in its path. Claudia and Frieda are also briefly drawn into this unstable quartet. An illuminating detail coloring this scene in the novel is the fact that Claudia had seen her father naked and had found it fascinating but not shameful.

Now, after this incident, she is ashamed of being unashamed. And you ugly! And what did that mean? We were lesser. His interaction with Pecola supplies the narrative with a vignette portraying the dynamics of class division in American society. She falls under the spell of lifestyle and beauty standards that she cannot achieve and consequently drifts into resentment, selfrighteousness, and greater isolation. Cut off from any source of emotional self-nourishment, she is unable to nurture her children.

Her daughter, Pecola, calls her Mrs. Breedlove and slowly succumbs to mental illness. He endures two massive emotional assaults: These wounds stay with Cholly and eventually compromise his will to live. She is a woman of great energy and warmth and, as a result, is surrounded by a bevy of older female friends who heap affection and concern onto Cholly. When she becomes ill and dies, Cholly is overwhelmed with feelings of loss but has no means of expressing them.

She is said to have died from eating peach cobbler, but because no one else succumbed to the same affliction, the circumstances surrounding her demise will become another interesting part of her story. They share a disdain for societal expectations of respectable behavior. Their best memories concern good meals when times allowed it and one or two particular men, but in the main they despise and abuse men.

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China is preoccupied with her hair, using Nu Nile, a hair straightener, to alter her appearance. Their blowzy friendliness provides Pecola with a reliable source of human interaction and enables her to ask questions about love and men, topics of growing concern to the little girl.

Without essential nurturing, he develops cruel and controlling tendencies, making Pecola the target of his negative behavior. The Fisher family provides Pauline Breedlove with employment, status, and a level of satisfaction otherwise inaccessible to her. The family is at the opposite end of the economic spectrum from the Breedloves. Being white and wealthy, they enjoy security, abundance, and the privilege of living next to a fancy and segregated city park.

Critical Perspectives Past and Present, x. The reader encounters both these features in the initial pages of The Bluest Eye. First to contend with is an extract from the nowdiscredited Dick and Jane reader, which millions of American schoolchildren, up until approximately the s, used to learn how to read. For varying reasons, the primer fell out of favor approximately four decades ago. Prior to that, it was part of the American educational establishment, and many older adults readily recognize the characters and are able to recite specific sentences.

To label these stories as unrealistic is only one of their shortcomings as literacy tools. No nonwhite individuals are portrayed; no relatives or visitors from any faraway places enter the pages. However intended, these primers were perfect disseminators of cultural messages about beauty, behavior, and privilege easily assimilated by young minds intently focused on the magic of reading. The simple sentences set in motion a narrative leading to increasingly complex assumptions and expectations about the world.

The 27 readers also proved injurious to those who unrealistically and without reflection carried these images into life after school. Morrison introduces the Dick and Jane readers into her narrative to underscore this particular effect of their use as an educational tool. The first sentences of the novel replicate a brief and conventionally written passage from the primer, followed by the same sentences minus all marks of punctuation, and finally, the same passage repeated with all spaces between the words eliminated.

The repetition duplicates our own early reading experiences where sentence following sentence yielded increasing detail and understanding, but along with the memory of the drill comes the recognition of the power of words and ideas. Another possible effect of using the primer may have been to remind readers that for a significant period of time in U.

Claudia laments that they could not save Pecola or her baby despite their determination to will the desired outcome into being by finding a magic formula: Later, still obsessed by the failure of their marigolds, the sisters wished they had noticed that theirs were not the only marigolds failing to bloom; even in the gardens of the white-owned homes on the Lake Erie shores the marigolds had failed to bloom that year, suggesting that in Lorain, Ohio, in , something was amiss in the community.

It also assumes a measure of interest, intimacy, even conspiracy between the one sharing the gossip and the listener. Used here as the first words uttered by Claudia, the phrase functions as an invitation to the reader to participate in the ancient tradition of listening to storytellers pondering the mysteries of life.

In this way, Claudia takes on a role Morrison emphasized in her own writing—that of the griot who, in African folklore, is responsible for repeating and enlivening the traditional teachings in order to ensure that the essential wisdom and secrets will be transmitted through the generations.

This development in Claudia is one of the major issues the novel considers. Morrison scholar Trudier Harris makes this observation: When she assumes that role, she identifies herself as an active tradition bearer, who, in her younger as well as her more mature manifestations, has the responsibility of putting a horrible tale into perspective. The tale is one in which the culture has been threatened from without as well as from within; it therefore takes on the form of myth. How can a people survive such assaults on them?

And if they do, who will give voice to their heroic or failed efforts? Harris, Fiction and Folklore: Literacy here is a life-saving acquisition. Intimations of poverty are everywhere: But there is also a sense of security in the home: Awareness of hierarchy and exclusion are central issues in the novel, experienced minimally in the domestic life but as a pervasive and insidious influence outside the home. Rosemary taunts the sisters by sitting in the family Buick eating bread with butter on it.

The scene is reminiscent of the dramas all children must endure in the early years of identity formation. It also functions as a portal into the divisions between people and classes and points to the destructive influence of internalizing the idealized images of the dominant culture. Of this scene, critic Evelyn Schreiber writes: Rather than passive acceptance of their historically designated object position, the girls physically assert their beings on Rosemary by attacking her and marring the skin that in white culture puts Rosemary above them and denies their subject status.

The girls internalize their place in the social world through these responses to daily encounters. The class differences between Rosemary Vilanucci, and Frieda and Claudia become apparent with the bread and butter she eats while they are hungry and the Buick she sits in.

She seems to react intuitively to their beating by feeling she should further sexualize it. Morrison is cautious about judging too quickly the transgressions of others, or, rather, she insists on seeing things from multiple perspectives.

Like all children, the sisters are often mystified by the goingson of adult life. Claudia and Frieda love to overhear their mother chattering and gossiping with her friends; they listen for 32 secrets about members of the community and for explanations of perplexing events. When Mr.

Henry shows up at their door and becomes a boarder in the household, they are unable to detect the signs of his secret appetites and general neediness because they are so pleased when he addresses them as the glamorous Hollywood stars, Greta Garbo and Ginger Rogers. There is a difference between being put out and being put outdoors. If you are put out, you go somewhere else; if you are outdoors, there is no place to go. The distinction was subtle but final. Outdoors was the end of something, an irrevocable, physical fact, defining and complementing our metaphysical condition.

Being a minority in both caste and class, we moved about anyway on the hem of life, struggling to consolidate our weaknesses and hang on, or creep singly up into the major folds of the garment. The voice of an older Claudia remembers: Knowing that there was such a thing as outdoors bred in us a hunger for property, for ownership.

The firm possession of a yard, a porch, a grape arbor. Propertied 33 black people spent all their energies, all their love, on their nests. Like frenzied, desperate birds, they over decorated everything; fussed and fidgeted over their hardwon homes; canned, jellied, and preserved all summer to fill the cupboards and shelves; they painted, picked, and poked at every corner of their houses. She brings nothing with her and, when no one is looking, helps herself to three quarts of milk.

The discovery of the missing milk sends Mrs. She knows something about being a nurturing mother. The appearance of the Shirley Temple cup brings to the fore the vexing questions about establishing definitions of beauty and right behavior—what standards exist for definitions of beauty, how to consider racial differences in appreciating cultural beauty, and, most importantly, what consequences are associated with living under a dominant definition of beauty that minority peoples can never realize?

Critic Barbara Christian writes: In appearance and temperament, Shirley Temple was like the Jane character in the primer, a model child. The blue-and-white cup bearing an image of her happy, dimpled face is one example. Frieda and Pecola share an adoration of Shirley Temple that Claudia at first repudiates. Claudia confesses that as a child she did not like dolls, despising the ones she got for Christmas from adults who never actually asked her what she would like to have as a gift.

She will need to find another way to take her stand against a set of ideals that will always undermine rather than nurture her well-being. The discovery comes as a shock. MacTeer and certain to stir up trouble: The episode has a benign but not fully reassuring ending: The conversation among the three little girls in bed that night is inspired by the events of the day; Pecola wonders how menstruation makes babies possible.

I mean, how do you get someone to love you? In the next section, we see what was formerly the Breedlove family dwelling—as sharp a contrast to the green-and-white house with the red door belonging to Dick and Jane as one could imagine.

Eliot will likely be reminded of scenes from The Waste Land, where the desolation and physical ugliness of modern urban sprawl predominate, and relationships between people are strained at best, sterile at worst, and always transient. The economic realities of the times combined with the less overt northern racism undermined these expectations in many instances. Trudier Harris writes: The cultural beliefs that inform the storytelling in The Bluest Eye are manifested in a reversal of cultural health for black people, an acquiescence to destructive myths.

Morrison creates an environment and a landscape in which infertility is the norm, where values with the potential to sustain have been reversed or perverted, and where few individuals have the key to transcending their inertia. Her depiction of the cycle of seasons without growth, from autumn to summer, evoke, in their mythological implications, comparisons to the legend of the Fisher King and to the world T. Eliot creates in The Waste Land.

The novel is a ritualized exploration of the dissolution of culture and the need for an attendant rite of affirmation. Harris, 27 The description of the interior of the Breedlove home suggests and reflects the dysfunctionality of the people who had been living there. The space is so nonnurturing and incommodious that family members are not only unable to relate to one another, they cannot form pleasant associations with the physical features of the house: The furniture had aged without ever having become familiar.

People had owned it, but never known it. No one had lost a penny or a brooch under the cushions of either sofa and remembered the place and time of the loss or the finding. Cholly Breedlove has an alcoholic stench that sickens his daughter Pecola, and his drinking renders him almost useless around the house. Breedlove thinks of herself as a religious woman, but she is more selfrighteous than religious.

Fierce and physical arguments rescue the couple from complete boredom: The conflicts impart significant damage to the next generation as well. Sammy Breedlove expresses himself through bursts of murderous rage aimed at his father, and Pecola, staying hidden in bed to escape the sounds of parental fighting, and suffering 38 from nausea that might be an early sign of her pregnancy, asks God to help her become invisible.

To this end, she has invented a mental strategy to make each part of her body disappear, except her eyes. Claudia has two voices in the story. To gain access to the innermost thoughts of Pecola, Morrison also creates the voice of an omniscient narrator. This intermixing of voices with different perspectives from varying time frames is necessary for understanding as fully as possible the causes, influences, and consequences of the various actions her vivid characters take.

At the beginning of the section describing Breedlove family life, Morrison makes clear that this family has one thing in common aside from but connected to their shared dysfunction: The Breedloves did not live in a storefront because they were having temporary difficulty adjusting to cutbacks at the plant. They lived there because they were poor and black, and stayed there because they believed they were ugly. Although their poverty was traditional and stultifying, it was not unique.

But their ugliness was unique. No one could have convinced them that they were not relentlessly and aggressively ugly. Poverty by itself does not ruin people. Throughout the novel, Morrison adds to our understanding about why each member of the family has acquired a destructive and self-sabotaging attitude, but it is Pecola she chooses as her focus.

She has been explicit about her reasons for concentrating on the character of Pecola. Writing in , critic Stephanie A. Pecola is. Pecola stands for the triple indemnity of the female Black child: Long hours she sat looking into the mirror, trying to discover the secret of the ugliness, the ugliness that made her ignored or despised at school, by teachers and classmates alike.

It had occurred to Pecola some time ago that if her eyes. If she looked different, beautiful, maybe Cholly would be different, and Mrs.

Breedlove, too. She is discouraged but not without hope: She would see only what there was to see: Pecola becomes the object of such a disapproving gaze when she visits the candy store with her three pennies. Yacobowski, proprietor of his own grocery store and another member of the white immigrant population, impatiently, almost resentfully, waits on Pecola. She gets what she came for—three pieces of the candy called Mary Janes—but is denied what she more importantly needs, friendly human contact.

Mary Jane, the character for whom the candies are named, appears pictured on the wrappers, her pretty, blue-eyed face smiling mischievously. Critic Tracey L. From candy wrappers, to movie stars and dolls Pecola cannot escape the culturally promoted image of blonde hair and blue eyes. She achieves this by eating Mary Jane candy. It is with these friendly women—not, strikingly, with her own mother or other appropriate adult female—that Pecola feels sufficiently comfortable to ask questions about men, sex, and love.

All she knows of love is what she has overheard: Boredom is a problem, too, but Claudia and her friends soon learn they were better off with boredom than they are with the unboring surprise they receive: Maureen appears to have no flaws—a condition the sisters find unendurable, so they come up with a nickname for her, transforming Maureen Peal into Meringue Pie, and they learn 42 that she has both an unattractive canine tooth and signs of an early disfigurement on her hands.

Morrison critics in general praise the author for her adeptness at exposing the causes and consequences of class divisions in American society. Yacobowski is one example of the subtlety of these dynamics: The appearance of Maureen Peal allows Morrison to make even more potent observations. Morrison clearly. The making of such a divisive hierarchy based on economic status and skin color is harmful to everyone.

That they themselves were black, or that their own father had similarly relaxed habits was irrelevant. It was their contempt for their own blackness that gave the first insult its teeth. They seemed to have taken all of their smoothly cultivated ignorance, their exquisitely learned self-hatred, their elaborately designed hopelessness and sucked it all up into a fiery cone of scorn that had burned for ages in the hollows of their minds—cooled—and spilled over lips of outrage, consuming whatever was in its path.

Claudia and Frieda are also briefly drawn into this unstable quartet. An illuminating detail coloring this scene in the novel is the fact that Claudia had seen her father naked and had found it fascinating but not shameful. Now, after this incident, she is ashamed of being unashamed. Safely across the street, Maureen adds her own especially divisive insult: And you ugly! And what did that mean? We were lesser.

They are further ennobled by this mature lifesaving insight: All the time we knew that Maureen Peal was not the Enemy and not worthy of such intense hatred. The Thing to fear was the Thing that made her beautiful, and not us. Henry wearing only his bathrobe. He entices them with pennies for ice cream to leave the house so he can have his scheduled private tryst with the prostitutes but is discovered and confronted by the girls returning earlier than he had expected.

Upon being discovered, Mr. Henry turns from the slightly overfriendly boarder into the needy and prurient older man the sisters have intuitively suspected him of being. The sisters lie so they can avoid the harsh realization of an adult exposed to be other than he initially seemed. They also enjoy Mr. Also emerging in this scene are rumor and gossip surrounding another adult who may also be hiding the truth.

These sugar-brown Mobile girls. Here they learn. They marry men who appreciate their efforts, and they have children; they tolerate but do not enjoy sex. Joy, in fact, seems fairly absent in all aspects of their lives. She lives with her family: The cat gets the only physical attention Geraldine is prepared to give or receive—a relocation of intimacy that deprives her son, Junior, and drives him to acts of cruelty and other behaviors certain to bring about a disturbed and friendless childhood.

Unrestrained in her effort to appear respectable, as others have defined it, she has chosen to adorn the house with a wealth of doilies, houseplants, and framed pictures decorated with fake flowers.

Standing, mesmerized by this display, Pecola is startled when Junior suddenly throws the cat at her face, leaving her scratched and frightened. When she tries to flee, Junior displays the kind of frenzied and controlling behavior that, combined with the presumably fatal blow he next inflicts on the cat, is indicative of antisocial pathology. When Geraldine arrives on the scene to find her inert cat on the floor, she looks at Pecola—dirty torn dress, unruly hair, muddy shoes—and instantly assumes the little girl from an impoverished family is the culprit: They were everywhere.

They slept six in a bed, all their pee mixing together in the night as they wet their beds. Mbalia writes: When Geraldine sees Pecola, she is reminded of everything she has sought to escape—everything associated with the poor, struggling African masses. Mbalia, 35 Another critic, Jan Furman, makes a further point: With the wrong conditions or too little nurturing, however, neither twig nor child grows properly.

Claudia begins her spring recollections with an instance of sexual violation. Returning from some private time in the long springtime grass, where she has been enjoying imaginative reveries about 48 matters of life and death, Claudia finds things amiss at home. Henry, deprived of his association with the prostitutes, has molested Frieda by touching her breasts.

Henry actually did and how Frieda felt about it. Papa MacTeer throws a tricycle at Mr. A neighbor rushes in with a gun, in response to the clamor, and Mr. It also underscores all the more that some individuals, such as Pecola, have no advocates with a stake at protecting their innocence and well-being.

The sisters head off to find Pecola, despite their certainty that straying too far from their part of town will not please their mother. All three girls stand as if starstruck at the sight of the picture-book kitchen, but the scene quickly devolves into chaos when Pecola accidentally knocks the freshly baked fruit cobbler to the floor. Once again, Morrison depicts unnatural and shocking behavior by a character she then labors to explain.

The ninth of eleven children, Pauline must have grown up with a chaotic and inadequate family life, so that later, possibly in compensation, she becomes especially devoted to keeping things in proper order.

Her formative years were also characterized by hard work and emotional isolation, factors that potentially explain why she is so receptive to the hymns 50 she hears in church, the ones in which a being of total love and understanding for each soul offers solace and companionship.

Her favorite begins: Throughout her life, the colors of nature have been important to Pauline. She has an artistic sense but no means of expressing it or strengthening her life by connecting with and expressing her authentic roots.

Cholly brings color, energy, and intimacy to her life, putting Pauline temporarily in the throes of romance. She recalls: When I first seed Cholly. My whole dress was messed with purple, and it never did wash out. Not the dress nor me. I could feel that purple deep inside me. From there, after agreeing to marry, they decide to continue the migration and head farther north to Ohio to find work and establish a home. This hopeful and excited Pauline is the same woman who, a few pages earlier, sent her daughter away after knocking her down.

What occasioned such a radical transformation in this once kind, hopeful woman? Of this general migration, Barbara Christian writes: Migration from the rural South to a more or less urban North has had great impact on the lives of Afro-Americans. Morrison [introduces] 51 Lorain, Ohio as a land that would allow neither the marigolds nor Pecola to grow. As new inhabitants, and as black people, they are looked down upon by the more established white community.

The black migrants must therefore learn to survive in this land that is at present a sterile one for them, even as they try to evolve a tradition that is functional in this place. Until they do, their lives will lack coherence. As one cut off from her own sustaining roots, she becomes easy prey to the Hollywood-driven and commercial promotions of standards of desirable beauty and respectable lifestyles. Pregnancy temporarily eases relations between Pauline and Cholly, but the loneliness persists—an isolation she recognizes as different from the loneliness experienced back home.

For solace, she goes to the movies where in the dark her memory was refreshed, and she succumbed to her earlier dreams. Along with the idea of romantic love, she was introduced to another—physical beauty. Probably the most destructive ideas in the history of human thought.

Both originated in envy, thrived in insecurity, and ended in disillusionment. She was 52 never able, after her education in the movies, to look at a face and not assign it some category in the scale of absolute beauty. The rest of her monologue confirms this change.

In imaginative and endearing language, Pauline talks to not-yet-born Pecola, forming a bond with her second child and a promise to make things different.

She was once a person with a dreaming and artistic sensibility. She was also a hard worker. She has become a mother with nothing to give her children except advice to not be like their father, and she offers no reason for her children to bond with her. By giving Pauline her own voice, Morrison allows her careworn mother figure to speak of the 53 tragedy she perceives her life to be. Critical and Theoretical Approaches, Cholly, we already know, has burned down his house and raped his daughter.

Of all the characters, Cholly has the most unlikely and inauspicious of beginnings. His Aunt Jimmy, an elderly but still robust and large-hearted woman, rescued Cholly from the train tracks when he was four days old, abandoned by both parents.

Jimmy becomes the center of her circle of like-minded female friends, and it is this communal upbringing that saves Cholly from complete bitterness and despair. Cholly grows up to become vigorous, sensual, respectful, and, although shy, able to draw attention to himself both for his robust appearance and his willingness to work.

After eating too much and suffering a small episode of public humiliation, he disappears into the countryside with Jake, possibly a cousin of his, and two young women.

This much larger humiliation Cholly endures with great difficulty: Sullen, irritable, he cultivated his hatred of Darlene. Never once did he consider directing his hatred toward 54 the hunters. Such an emotion would have destroyed him. They were big, white, armed men. He was small, black, helpless. His subconscious knew what his conscious mind did not guess—that hating them would have consumed him. He meets up with a surly gambler bearing the name Aunt Jimmy had recollected years earlier, but the encounter is devastating, ending in rejection and another humiliation too huge for him to absorb.

So the young man runs until he has outdistanced everything familiar to him. Morrison concludes: Only a musician would sense, know, without even knowing that he knew, that Cholly was free.

Dangerously free. Free to feel whatever he felt—fear, guilt, shame, love, grief, pity. Free to be tender or violent. Arriving home in a drunken stupor, he comes upon Pecola washing the dishes, frail in body, raggedly dressed, and thinks: Lynn Orilla Scott writes: She is shocked, baffled, helpless, and violated.

The scene has provoked diverse and competing critical responses and perspectives. Where does the fault really lie? As with other self-deluded Morrison characters with disturbed personalities, Soaphead has learned to see his antipathy for other people as a virtue; it was, he determines, a means of developing character: Soaphead failed in his plan to become a priest and thus fools himself into thinking he prefers pursuing a profession with a seemingly important title but that actually requires neither talent nor hard work: This fastidiousness leaves Soaphead at a loss: Whom 56 will he consort with?

Soaphead, originally named Elihue Micah Whitcomb, descended from this lineage, going on to acquire new levels of misunderstood and misapplied education. Pregnant and banned from attending school, Pecola, her mental stability in question, comes to Soaphead in search of a miracle. Soaphead hears her request and feels a benign impulse to help her and an appropriate frustration with himself for having only 57 the pretense of power.

Poisoning the dog is an act that is cruel to the animal and the landlady but also to the trusting Pecola, who unwittingly offers poisoned meat to the dog and pats its head, until, in horror, she watches it convulse and die. Morrison has given us both a cat and a dog story in her novel that are a grotesque reworking of the stories of Puff and Spot, the faithful, perfect pets from the Dick and Jane readers. As his pride swells, however, the letter turns into a vehicle for Soaphead to chastise God for overlooking things he should be noticing and for making an imperfect world to begin with.

He ends by accusing God of going off the track: Exhausted with his saintly efforts to help Pecola and inform God about the deed, Soaphead becomes sleepy and goes to bed. Ever deluded, he has managed to convince himself that he has ascended to a place of power and saintliness greater than that occupied by God. Playing with Difference, Morrison makes one of her many comments in praise of women: Black women have held, have been given. She then fills two pages describing female fortitude and selflessness.

They hugged the memories of illnesses to their bosoms. All of the bruises they had collected from moving about the earth—harvesting, cleaning, hoisting, pitching, stooping, kneeling, picking—always with young ones underfoot.

Then they [became] old.

The Bluest Eye

They had carried a world on their heads. They had given over the lives of their own children and tendered their grandchildren. They were, in fact and at last, free. And the lives of these old black women were synthesized in their 59 eyes—a puree of tragedy and humor, wickedness and serenity, truth and fantasy. Morrison has presented us with the stories of two parallel lives. The last words the reader hears from Pecola are delusional—a conversation she is having with an imaginary friend because her family and community have failed to provide her with the self-esteem necessary to make and sustain a genuine relationship with anyone.

What brought about these very different outcomes? One hint comes in the memory of a vision Claudia has of her own mother as she prepares to tell the last part of the story. These images of strong and enduring women, of mothers who labor unceasingly to promote and ensure the well-being of others, form the foundation for The Bluest Eye.

Despite their poverty, the MacTeer family has achieved a form of stability with both mother and father contributing to and protecting the family life. In the novel, sounds of singing interweave with—and express and deflect—some of the pain of life. Lisa Williams writes: By listening and then speaking, Claudia becomes a modernday griot who affirms, as she participates in storytelling, the culture that the white society would like to destroy.

Her positive self-identity is nurtured by her continuing relation to a maternal oral tradition Williams, Some things, Morrison has reminded us, can be made sense of only through the eyes of an artist.

Through her singing wisdom and sometimes overly harsh protectiveness, Mrs. MacTeer has enabled her daughter to choose self-preservation over selfdestruction. As Claudia tells of how she and Frieda go door to door selling seeds to get money for a new bicycle, we see how the protective rules their mother has put in place restricting how far they can go can be reasonably although deceptively dismissed, as the girls feel sufficiently safe and secure to stray into unfamiliar territory.

They encounter no dangers and are, in fact, invited into some of the homes for cold lemonade and a rest. While they are experiencing these manifestations of community support, they overhear the gossip about Pecola, which is related entirely in tones of condemnation that convey the absence of community support for the child. Claudia recalls: The Breedloves suffer from double rejections—from themselves, believing themselves to be ugly and therefore unworthy, and from the community.

The bits of community conversation that Claudia assembles for the reader vividly convey the narrowness of understanding displayed by the townspeople. Morrison shows her readers that these mechanisms of self-protection are not only self-righteous, they are reminders of the countless ways people do not see or bear witness properly as Mr.

She is not a judgmental author. She shows how Claudia and Frieda have been able to internalize an ethical and humanitarian imperative, while others have not.

Locating blame is not part of her authorial task. As Barbara Christian writes: It encompasses three hundred years of unsuccessful interface between black and white culture. Christian, 60 In response to the failure of the community, the sisters decide to take on its task of supporting all of its members.

She took responsibility for the failure, but it was neither rational nor accurate for her to be the lone guilty party. She knows that the terrible guilt is shared—by everyone, including by those most damaged.

She chastises herself for her part in the failure and makes clear that she will never be at peace with what she has witnessed. In the prologue, Claudia says that the earth, like Pecola, refused to grow the planted seeds; she closes the novel with the image of Pecola wandering, lost in madness at the edge of their town among refuse and sunflowers.

Marigolds and sunflowers are gold, symbolic in alchemy of psychic and sacred wholeness. In this novel there is no cosmic ground of being that mothers us all; time is fluent and so much human and natural potential is irrevocably lost. The final vision of Pecola mad and lost amidst the garbage, yet juxtaposed to the sunflowers, is a 64 metaphysically surreal jolt. By rejecting the seasons, the earth, human society, she exposes the romanticism of faith in these abstractions.

The human body itself, and mother—daughter bonding, also are revealed as killers not healers. The novel opens with a story of Claudia vomiting in her bed. Masculine libido deflects into childmolesting and incest.

Thus unpleasant truths about being embodied are forced on us repeatedly—truths we erase with technology and sanitation. Imagery of hope does exist within the family, but only in the most minimal form because the adults themselves are so overwhelmed with the struggle for survival. MacTeer, scolds her children when they get sick, threatening to sap her energy so constantly depleted by the struggle for survival.

Come and play. Come play with Jane. The kitten will not play. See Mother. Mother is very nice. Mother will you play with Jane? Mother laughs. Laugh, mother laugh. See Father.

Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye (Bloom's Guides)

He is big and strong. Father will you play with Jane? Father is smiling. Smile, Father, smile. See the dog run.

Run, dog, run. Look, look. Here comes a friend. The friend will play with Jane. They will play a good game. Play, Jane, play. Morrison, Morrison quotes directly the above paragraph of "Dick and Jane" narrative. It is an authentic replica that represents an ideal white family of middle class, although the race of Dick and Jane is not clear.

Klotman claims that the first version symbolizes the lifestyle of the alien white world represented by the Fisher family that effects on the lives of the black children and their families while excluding them.

According to this text, the white family is associated with morality, prosperity. There is no wrong with such a family, everything is perfect. Critics have called it as the "idyllic" Dick and Jane" Utopia" Bump, In this perfect world, there is no room to blacks, whoever than whites is hyphenated. The white culture imposes its standards of beauty as a privilege.

Superiority is related to whiteness, and inferiority to blackness. Here, the decisive scale is that of colour which means that the white is beautiful and the black is ugly. In this way, Africans' sense of community life is destroyed. After careful reading to the quoted text, you can find what you assume to be perfect world is just a fake, i. No member of this happy family answers her need and play with her.

Then, then the white culture is just a veneer without essence. It shows no capitalization and punctuation; to some extent, it looks confused: Here is the house it is green and white it has a red door it is very pretty here is the family mother father dick and jane live in the green and white house they are very happy see jane has a red dress she wants to play who will play with jane see the cat it goes meow-meow come and play with jane the kitten will not play see mother mother is very nice mother will you play with jane mother laughs laugh see father he is big and strong father will you play with jane father is smiling smile father smile see the dog bowwow goes the dog do you want to play with jane see the dog run run dog run look look here comes a friend the friend will play with jane they will play a good play jane play Morrison, The pressure of the dominant community which imposes its standards of living and physical beauty on the black community creats longing on the part of some of its members to emulate or match the standards of the stereotypes.

Those members are either mimics or those who are generated by intermingling of white race with blacks mixed race. In favour of white supremacy, mimics and mixed race indulged in the customs and values of the dominant culture in order to establish an identity and win acceptance among the white society. In doing that, it seems that they are divorced from their own race. That means more prestige could be attained among the black community and privilege of better communication with the white society Anderson, Within the novel the prototype characters that represent this class are Mrs.

Geraldine as mimic and Maureen Peal as mixed race.Moreover, Pecola becomes a victim twice. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Where does the fault really lie? Breedlove thinks of herself as a religious woman, but she is more selfrighteous than religious.

Years later, she recalled having been profoundly drawn to the classical writers—Austen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, and others.

LEATRICE from Rancho Cucamonga
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