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his autobiography# “ Human, all-too-Human, is the monument of a crisis. It is entitled: ' A book for free spirits/ and almost every line in it represents a victory— in. This free ebook was downloaded from pixia-club.info: · http://www. pixia-club.info The Project Gutenberg EBook of Human, All Too Human, by Friedrich Nietzsche This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no.


Human All Too Human Pdf

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Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche. No cover available. Download; Bibrec. Human, All Too Human was Nietzsche's second book; and it was as far removed from All Too Human the subtitle 'A Book for Free Spirits'; and he went on to. Human, All Too Human subtitled A Book for Free Spirits by Nietzsche originally published in Download the Nietzsche Ebook for free in.

Nietzsche's work, however, "is unique; he covers a range of issues far greater than the social and psychological area of interest to La Rochefoucauld.

To the cynicism typical of the genre, Nietzsche brings a new dimension by his combination of nihilistic energy with historical consciousness. Finally, he expands the genre to include not merely insights, but argument as well. Reluctant to construct a systematic philosophy, this book comprises more a collection of debunkings of unwarranted assumptions than an interpretation and "contains the seeds of concepts crucial to Nietzsche's later philosophy, such as the need to transcend conventional Christian morality"; [6] :back page he uses his perspectivism and the idea of the will to power as explanatory devices, though the latter remains less developed than in his later thought.

Of First and Last Things[ edit ] In this first section Nietzsche deals with metaphysics , specifically its origins as relating to dreams, the dissatisfaction with oneself, and language as well. Excerpt: At the waterfall.

When we see a waterfall, we think we see freedom of will and choice in the innumerable turnings, windings, breakings of the waves; but everything is necessary; each movement can be calculated mathematically. Thus it is with human actions; if one were omniscient, one would be able to calculate each individual action in advance, each step in the progress of knowledge, each error, each act of malice. To be sure the acting man is caught in his illusion of volition; if the wheel of the world were to stand still for a moment and an omniscient, calculating mind were there to take advantage of this interruption, he would be able to tell into the farthest future of each being and describe every rut that wheel will roll upon.

The acting man's delusion about himself, his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism. The Birth of Tragedy Before approaching the contents of The Birth, one must have a clear sense of the significance Nietzsche originally attached to his first work.

Ritschl, KSB 3, p.

In sections , Nietzsche details how the epic poetry of Homer and the tragic art of Aeschylus developed as life-affirming responses to the Dionysian wisdom of Silenus BT 3, p. In sections , Nietzsche argues that the optimism of Socrates,15 and its implicit rejection of the Dionysian wisdom of Silenus, led to the death of tragedy at the hands of Euripides, a clandestine champion of this new thinking.

For the purposes of this study, we need to isolate three crucial ideas implicit in the structure of The Birth.

Once this type of thinking disappears, tragedy loses its purpose and eventually withers away. Conversely, in order for genuine tragedy to be reborn, the tragic vision of man and nature must first be restored.

Second, the rebirth of tragic thinking will not take place through a return to mythical reflections on the nature of man, but rather through the discoveries of those committed to the Socratic quest for truth.

On the one hand, Socrates marks the first appearance of the theoretical man on the world historical stage; he is the will-to- truth incarnate, and Nietzsche, himself a passionate lover of knowledge, is a follower of Socrates in this respect.

Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits

On the other hand, Socrates represents the anti-tragic forces of optimism, the man who convinced figures like Euripides and the young tragedian, Plato, that thought could comprehend and ultimately correct existence BT 15, p. It is this optimistic thinking that Nietzsche rejects and, at times, even despises. Nietzsche holds that the optimistic beliefs contained within Socratism cannot withstand the test of truth. Thus, there is a tension within the Socratic project, and it will only be a matter of time before the quest for truth undermines the optimistic myth that originally glorified this very search.

According to Nietzsche, this crucial turn has already taken place in modern philosophy.

As men of knowledge, Kant and Schopenhauer embody the principles of the theoretical man who first came to light in the person of Socrates. Here, I will only say that I interpret Human as the work in which Nietzsche breaks with Wagner and Schopenhauer as those responsible for the rebirth of tragic culture and takes over the project himself.

Nietzsche symbolizes his turn toward the Socratic quest for truth by dedicating the first edition of his work to Voltaire and adopting the rationalism of Descartes. By identifying with Voltaire, Nietzsche attaches his own philosophical project to the spirit of an age that ultimately led to the tragic insights of Kant and Schopenhauer.

Second, the rebirth of tragic thinking will not take place through a return to mythical reflections on the nature of man, but rather through the discoveries of those committed to the Socratic quest for truth.

On the one hand, Socrates marks the first appearance of the theoretical man on the world historical stage; he is the will-to- truth incarnate, and Nietzsche, himself a passionate lover of knowledge, is a follower of Socrates in this respect. On the other hand, Socrates represents the anti-tragic forces of optimism, the man who convinced figures like Euripides and the young tragedian, Plato, that thought could comprehend and ultimately correct existence BT 15, p.

It is this optimistic thinking that Nietzsche rejects and, at times, even despises. Nietzsche holds that the optimistic beliefs contained within Socratism cannot withstand the test of truth.

Thus, there is a tension within the Socratic project, and it will only be a matter of time before the quest for truth undermines the optimistic myth that originally glorified this very search. According to Nietzsche, this crucial turn has already taken place in modern philosophy. As men of knowledge, Kant and Schopenhauer embody the principles of the theoretical man who first came to light in the person of Socrates.

Here, I will only say that I interpret Human as the work in which Nietzsche breaks with Wagner and Schopenhauer as those responsible for the rebirth of tragic culture and takes over the project himself.

Nietzsche symbolizes his turn toward the Socratic quest for truth by dedicating the first edition of his work to Voltaire and adopting the rationalism of Descartes.

By identifying with Voltaire, Nietzsche attaches his own philosophical project to the spirit of an age that ultimately led to the tragic insights of Kant and Schopenhauer.

Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Rather than rebelling against the scientific optimism of the 18th century, Nietzsche plans to use the principles of the Enlightenment to destroy it from within. To define the general ethic that will guide his efforts in Human, Nietzsche quotes Descartes in a passage that serves as the introduction to the edition of the work, part of which can be summarized as follows: The highest occupation of man consists in the continual development of reason in the unending quest for truth KSA 2, HH In Human, Nietzsche is the sober, objective, and Socratic man of science, and it does not take long for optimism to deteriorate in the hands of his enlightened approach.

What we find in this crucial aphorism is the repetition of what Nietzsche designated in The Birth to be the defining moment in the history of thought: With the exception of section five, in which he re-affirms his commitment to the scientific quest, Nietzsche systematically eliminates any optimistic hopes of finding meaning or happiness in this life or the next.

In the second aphorism of book three, Nietzsche quotes Byron to express the tragic relationship between knowledge and suffering: In book seven, he dispatches with women and children HH , and in book eight, he dismisses politics as rubbish for the rabble: The unity of opposites thesis essentially denies the metaphysical project initiated by the likes of Parmenides and Plato.

Human, All Too Human

In Human, however, Nietzsche is the man of Enlightenment science and, as such, has no right to tap into the creative powers of the imagination and the child-like joys of destruction.

Constrained by the morality of science and truth, he must remain detached and objective. The goal of this essay has been to show that Human resonates with, rather than rejects, the cultural project of The Birth. With Human, Nietzsche has given us his own version, liberated from the metaphysics and morals of his predecessors, of Dionysian wisdom comprised in concepts.

If this is indeed the case and the progression of thought initiated in Human does indeed transform itself into a tragic work of art in Zarathustra, then we can conclude with the following proposition: Walter Kaufmann New York: Vintage Books, For a similar reading, see: Yale University Press, , p.

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Cambridge University Press, , p. Hollingdale, 2nd ed.

Cambridge University Press, Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science, trans. The more taste diminishes, the more does the desire for art change and revert to a vulgar hunger, which the artist henceforth seeks to appease by ever coarser fare.

Music is, in fact, not a universal language for all time, as is so often said in its praise, but re- sponds exactly to a particular period and warmth of emotion which involves a quite definite, individual culture, determined by time and place, as its inner law.

Had he not also a goodly share of imperfection, he could, by reason of his virtue, never arrive at an intellectual or moral freedom. In the history of religious ideas many errors about development and false gradations are made in matters which in reality are not consecutive outgrowths but con- temporary yet separate phenomena.

With all that enthusiasts say in favour of their gospel or their master they are de- fending themselves, however much they comport themselves as the judges and not the accused: Certainly, there are many vigorous, sensible readers who could take objection to this.

But that is an error.

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